13

THE MYSTERIOUS PUZZLE

the mysterious puzzle antiquefables.com

In a college in Venice, a great puzzle had been placed on the notice board of the school by the founder of the school. For the past twenty years of the school’s existence, all the final year students would be availed the opportunity to try and solve the mysterious puzzle but no one could obtain the solution to the mysterious puzzle. It was once rumoured by some junior students that the solution to the puzzle lies beneath the great Tyrrhenian sea.

Fabio one of the final year students widely regarded as a student who was incapable of learning by his teachers made known of his intention to solve the puzzle much to the shock and the disdain of his classmates. Fabio employed every trick in the book possible to solve the puzzle but the solution continued to elude him. Fabio determined to get what he wants, set the puzzle on fire. He said to himself after the ignoble act, “the puzzle is burnt, there is no puzzle to solve anymore hence the solution “.

As soon as the news of Fabio’s act filled the school atmosphere immediately an assembly was called for by the founder. During the assembly, the founder pronounced Fabio as the smartest student in the school and will be duly rewarded, turns out there was no possible answer to the puzzle all along.

Moral Lesson

Written by Olayiwola Akinnagbe – antiquefables.com

14

AN AFRICAN EAGLE AND ITS DISOBEDIENT CHILD

african eagle and its disobedient child

african eagle and its disobedient child

An African eagle once had a child who was fond of disobeying her. In Africa, the Eagles believe that the best way to scold a child is to employ the use of the rod vigorously. They were of the assumption that an evil spirit possessing a child is responsible for the anomalous behaviour (s) exhibited by the child and the only way to make the evil spirit leave the child is to employ the use of the rod.

Over time, the mother observed that the more she chastised her child the more the child disobeyed her and also the more she grew resistant to her punishments. Henceforth, she opted to do things differently.

One day the child erred, the mother having enough of her child’s antics angrily picked the rod and proceeded for her child. She moved closer to her simultaneously striking the wall with great force just where her child was standing and screaming at her what she would do to her if she dares take her for granted again.

The child trembling in fear as a result of the vibrating force of the rod on the wall and its resonant effect although the rod didn’t touch her she cried profusely with hot streams of tears flowing down her cheeks. She apologized to her mom promising to change for the better.

Moral Lesson

  • Drop the threats and lose the stress: you can raise great kids with love!

Written by: Olayiwola Akinnagbe – AntiqueFables

4

THE DOG AND HIS WIFE

The dog and his wife had an irreconcilable fight. They both got separated and they argued who was going to kill each other first. The dog was the strongest of all animals not even the big cats would dare him to a fight.

The dog felt it was unfair for a powerful being like him to kill his wife with a weapon, he concluded he was going to beat her to death with his bare hands. Next day he went searching for his wife, found her and began beating her. As he was beating her she began to insult him claiming a powerful being like him is not ashamed of beating a weak being like her.

On hearing this the dog lost his composure and he became exceedingly angry, the wife noticed her husband has lost his sense of reasoning pulled out a small knife from her back and stabbed him in his heart. Please leave a comment

Writer: Olayiwola Akinnagbe – AntiqueFables

9

THE CHESTNUT AND THE FIG TREE

Source: https://www.maxpixel.net/Fig-Leaf-Back-Light-Real-Coward-Fig-Tree-Fruits-1432291

A man who had climbed upon a certain fig tree, was bending the boughs toward him and plucking the ripe fruit, which he then put into his mouth to destroy and gnaw with his hard teeth.
The chestnut, seeing this, tossed its long branches and with tumultuous rustle exclaimed: “Oh Fig! How much less protected by nature you are than I. See how my sweet offspring are set in close array; first clothed in soft wrappers over which is the hard but softly lined husk. And not content with this much care, nature has also given us these sharp and close-set spines, so that the hand of man cannot hurt us.”
Then the fig tree began to laugh, and after the laughter it said: “You know well that man is of such ingenuity that he will bereave even you of your children. But in your case he will do it by means of rods and stones; and when they are felled he will trample them with his feet or hit them with stones, so that your offspring will emerge from their armor crushed and maimed; while I am touched carefully by his hands, and never, like you, with roughness”

LEONARDO DAVINCI, 1452-1519

23

THE OWL WHO WAS GOD

Once upon a starless midnight, there was an owl who sat on the branch of an oak tree. Two ground moles tried to slip quietly by, unnoticed. “You!” said the owl. “Who?” they quavered, in fear and astonishment, for they could not believe it was possible for anyone to see them in that thick darkness. “You two!” said the owl. The moles hurried away and told the other creatures of the field and forest that the owl was the greatest and wisest of all animals because he could see in the dark and because he could answer any question.

 

Thanks for the image @ File Upload Bot (Magnus Manske) at en.wikipedia.

 

“I’ll see about that,” said a secretary bird, and he called on the owl one night when it was again very dark. “How many claws am I holding up?” said the secretary bird. “Two,” said the owl, and that was right. “Can you give me another expression for ‘that is to say’ or ‘namely?’ ” asked the secretary bird. “To wit,” said the owl. “Why does a lover call on his love?” asked the secretary bird. “To woo,” said the owl. The secretary bird hastened back to the other creatures and reported that the owl was indeed the greatest and wisest animal in the world because he could see in the dark and because he could answer any question.

“Can he see in the daytime, too?” asked a red fox. “Yes,” echoed a dormouse and a French poodle. “Can he see in the daytime, too?” All the other creatures laughed loudly at this silly question, and they set upon the red fox and his friends and drove them out of the region. Then they sent a messenger to the owl and asked him to be their leader

When the owl appeared among the animals it was high noon and the sun was shining brightly. He walked very slowly, which gave him an appearance of great dignity, and he peered about him with large, staring eyes, which gave him an air of tremendous importance. “He’s God!” screamed a Plymouth Rock Hen. And the others took up the cry “He’s God!” So they followed him wherever he went and when he began to bump into things they began to bump into things. too. Finally, he came to a concrete highway and he started up the middle of it and all the other creatures followed him.

Presently a hawk, who was acting as an outrider, observed a truck coming toward them at fifty miles an hour, and he reported to the secretary bird and the secretary bird reported to the owl. “There’s danger ahead, ” said the secretary bird. “To wit?” said the owl. The secretary bird told him. “Aren’t you afraid?” He asked. “Who?” said the owl calmly, for he could not see the truck. “He’s God!” cried all the creatures again, and they were still crying “He’s God!” when the truck hit them and ran them down. Some of the animals were merely injured, but most of them, including the owl, were killed.

JAMES THURBER, 1894-1961

18

THE SNAKE, THE FARMER AND THE HERON

A snake chased by hunters asked a farmer to save its life. To hide it from its pursuers, the farmer squatted and let the snake crawl into his belly. But when the danger had passed and the farmer asked the snake to come out, the snake refused. It was warm and safe inside. On his way home, the man saw a heron and went up to him and whispered what had happened. The heron told him to squat and strain to eject the snake. When the snake snuck its head out, the heron caught it, pulled it out, and killed it.

 

 

The farmer was worried that the snake’s poison might still be inside him and the heron told him that the cure for snake poison was to cook and eat six white fowl. “You’re a white fowl,” said the farmer. “You’ll do for a start.” He grabbed the heron, put it in a bag, and carried it home, where he hung it up while he told his wife what had happened. “I’m surprised at you, ” said the wife. “The bird does you a kindness, rids you of the evil in your belly, saves your life in fact, yet you catch it and talk of killing it. She immediately released the heron, and it flew away. But on its way, it gouged out her eyes.

Moral: When you see water flowing uphill, it means that someone is repaying a kindness

SOURCE: AFRICAN FOLK TALE